henshin-a-jojo-baby:

ironnyan:

THE RIDE NEVER ENDS

God bless SmegmaKing

drparisa:

'what is happiness to you?'

this gif of a toucan going down the stairs

image

chiefokeefe:

Internet Aristocrat on the Zoe Quinn Incidents and Corruption in Game Journalism. As a journalism student, and an avid gamer, some of this video made me sick to my stomach. 

(Due to the nature of the accusations made, I will be reuploadng this video should it be taken down for “copyright”)

shittywebcomics:

kc-vidya-rants:

Sorry, Zoe and her indie-drones, we’re not going to just let this “blow over”, 

This isn’t about you cheating on your boyfriend with Nathan Grayson, Robin Arnott, Joshua Boggs, Kyle Pulver, and Brandon McCartin, though infidelity is nothing to be admired. 

It’s about WHO THEY ARE. They were figures of authority, in a sense, and you used them to climb your way up the totem pole to get your game marketed. You openly admitted yourself that you didn’t even want to be a part of the video game industry,you instead wanted to “destabilize it” and “destroy the meritocracy” (that you took advantage of).

It’s actually funny that you think this will just “blow over”, you seem to be unaware of the permanence of these things on the internet, no matter how hard you and Boggs are trying to remove evidence of it. Every other forum is censoring this, but pretty much nothing gets deleted off of Tumblr. The information is out there, and there’s absolutely nothing you can do about it. 

You fucked journalists for good game reviews. You fucked YOUR MARRIED BOSS for promotion. You set a negative example for every up-and-coming female game developer, and we have all the proof in the world that this information isn’t faked or falsified in any way. This isn’t about harassment, this isn’t about “slut-shaming”, it’s about exposing Kotaku’s corruption and total lack of journalistic integrity in the indie dev and social justice scenes once and for all. 

Don’t let them shove this under the rug.

Press the attack.

Break them.

(Source: )

  • KID : mommy, i cant sleep, there's a monster under my bed
  • MOM : that's silly, theres no such thing as mo- OH GOD ITS TEARING MY ARM! Just kidding, he only eats kids, goodnight!
k1mkardashian:

bile4:

Go off

where/what is this and how can i participate?
k1mkardashian:

bile4:

Go off

where/what is this and how can i participate?
k1mkardashian:

bile4:

Go off

where/what is this and how can i participate?
k1mkardashian:

bile4:

Go off

where/what is this and how can i participate?
k1mkardashian:

bile4:

Go off

where/what is this and how can i participate?
k1mkardashian:

bile4:

Go off

where/what is this and how can i participate?
k1mkardashian:

bile4:

Go off

where/what is this and how can i participate?
k1mkardashian:

bile4:

Go off

where/what is this and how can i participate?
k1mkardashian:

bile4:

Go off

where/what is this and how can i participate?

k1mkardashian:

bile4:

Go off

where/what is this and how can i participate?

(Source: archiemcphee)

curepimmy:

discwars:

discwars:

discwars:

what the fuck is this bullshit

HES STILL THERE

THAT ONES NOT EVEN RED 

This reminds me of the time I was having trouble drawing fists, like

No shit I mean like on a PERSON

(Source: birdtouch)

lampghost:

dont hate the player, hate the controller, this shit is broken i swear to god i jumped bro

midesko:

Retail jobs summed up

(Source: shittyteenblog)

odditiesoflife:

Mysterious Coin-Covered Wishing Trees
The strange phenomenon of gnarled old trees with coins embedded all over their bark has been spotted from the Peak District to the Scottish Highlands in the United Kingdom. One of the larger collections can be seen in the picturesque village of Portmeirion in Wales where there are seven felled tree trunks with coins pushed into them.
The coins are usually knocked into the tree trunks using stones by passers-by, who hope it will bring them good fortune. These fascinating spectacles often have coins from centuries ago buried deep in their bark, warped from the passage of time.
The tradition of making offerings to deities at wishing trees dates back hundreds of years and is similar to the concept of a “wishing well”, where one tosses a coin in for good luck. The “wishing trees” date back to the early 1700s in Scotland where ill people stuck florins into trees with the idea that the trees would take any any illness. However if someone were to take away any of the coins, legend states that they will become ill instead.
sources 1, 2, 3
odditiesoflife:

Mysterious Coin-Covered Wishing Trees
The strange phenomenon of gnarled old trees with coins embedded all over their bark has been spotted from the Peak District to the Scottish Highlands in the United Kingdom. One of the larger collections can be seen in the picturesque village of Portmeirion in Wales where there are seven felled tree trunks with coins pushed into them.
The coins are usually knocked into the tree trunks using stones by passers-by, who hope it will bring them good fortune. These fascinating spectacles often have coins from centuries ago buried deep in their bark, warped from the passage of time.
The tradition of making offerings to deities at wishing trees dates back hundreds of years and is similar to the concept of a “wishing well”, where one tosses a coin in for good luck. The “wishing trees” date back to the early 1700s in Scotland where ill people stuck florins into trees with the idea that the trees would take any any illness. However if someone were to take away any of the coins, legend states that they will become ill instead.
sources 1, 2, 3
odditiesoflife:

Mysterious Coin-Covered Wishing Trees
The strange phenomenon of gnarled old trees with coins embedded all over their bark has been spotted from the Peak District to the Scottish Highlands in the United Kingdom. One of the larger collections can be seen in the picturesque village of Portmeirion in Wales where there are seven felled tree trunks with coins pushed into them.
The coins are usually knocked into the tree trunks using stones by passers-by, who hope it will bring them good fortune. These fascinating spectacles often have coins from centuries ago buried deep in their bark, warped from the passage of time.
The tradition of making offerings to deities at wishing trees dates back hundreds of years and is similar to the concept of a “wishing well”, where one tosses a coin in for good luck. The “wishing trees” date back to the early 1700s in Scotland where ill people stuck florins into trees with the idea that the trees would take any any illness. However if someone were to take away any of the coins, legend states that they will become ill instead.
sources 1, 2, 3
odditiesoflife:

Mysterious Coin-Covered Wishing Trees
The strange phenomenon of gnarled old trees with coins embedded all over their bark has been spotted from the Peak District to the Scottish Highlands in the United Kingdom. One of the larger collections can be seen in the picturesque village of Portmeirion in Wales where there are seven felled tree trunks with coins pushed into them.
The coins are usually knocked into the tree trunks using stones by passers-by, who hope it will bring them good fortune. These fascinating spectacles often have coins from centuries ago buried deep in their bark, warped from the passage of time.
The tradition of making offerings to deities at wishing trees dates back hundreds of years and is similar to the concept of a “wishing well”, where one tosses a coin in for good luck. The “wishing trees” date back to the early 1700s in Scotland where ill people stuck florins into trees with the idea that the trees would take any any illness. However if someone were to take away any of the coins, legend states that they will become ill instead.
sources 1, 2, 3
odditiesoflife:

Mysterious Coin-Covered Wishing Trees
The strange phenomenon of gnarled old trees with coins embedded all over their bark has been spotted from the Peak District to the Scottish Highlands in the United Kingdom. One of the larger collections can be seen in the picturesque village of Portmeirion in Wales where there are seven felled tree trunks with coins pushed into them.
The coins are usually knocked into the tree trunks using stones by passers-by, who hope it will bring them good fortune. These fascinating spectacles often have coins from centuries ago buried deep in their bark, warped from the passage of time.
The tradition of making offerings to deities at wishing trees dates back hundreds of years and is similar to the concept of a “wishing well”, where one tosses a coin in for good luck. The “wishing trees” date back to the early 1700s in Scotland where ill people stuck florins into trees with the idea that the trees would take any any illness. However if someone were to take away any of the coins, legend states that they will become ill instead.
sources 1, 2, 3
odditiesoflife:

Mysterious Coin-Covered Wishing Trees
The strange phenomenon of gnarled old trees with coins embedded all over their bark has been spotted from the Peak District to the Scottish Highlands in the United Kingdom. One of the larger collections can be seen in the picturesque village of Portmeirion in Wales where there are seven felled tree trunks with coins pushed into them.
The coins are usually knocked into the tree trunks using stones by passers-by, who hope it will bring them good fortune. These fascinating spectacles often have coins from centuries ago buried deep in their bark, warped from the passage of time.
The tradition of making offerings to deities at wishing trees dates back hundreds of years and is similar to the concept of a “wishing well”, where one tosses a coin in for good luck. The “wishing trees” date back to the early 1700s in Scotland where ill people stuck florins into trees with the idea that the trees would take any any illness. However if someone were to take away any of the coins, legend states that they will become ill instead.
sources 1, 2, 3
odditiesoflife:

Mysterious Coin-Covered Wishing Trees
The strange phenomenon of gnarled old trees with coins embedded all over their bark has been spotted from the Peak District to the Scottish Highlands in the United Kingdom. One of the larger collections can be seen in the picturesque village of Portmeirion in Wales where there are seven felled tree trunks with coins pushed into them.
The coins are usually knocked into the tree trunks using stones by passers-by, who hope it will bring them good fortune. These fascinating spectacles often have coins from centuries ago buried deep in their bark, warped from the passage of time.
The tradition of making offerings to deities at wishing trees dates back hundreds of years and is similar to the concept of a “wishing well”, where one tosses a coin in for good luck. The “wishing trees” date back to the early 1700s in Scotland where ill people stuck florins into trees with the idea that the trees would take any any illness. However if someone were to take away any of the coins, legend states that they will become ill instead.
sources 1, 2, 3
odditiesoflife:

Mysterious Coin-Covered Wishing Trees
The strange phenomenon of gnarled old trees with coins embedded all over their bark has been spotted from the Peak District to the Scottish Highlands in the United Kingdom. One of the larger collections can be seen in the picturesque village of Portmeirion in Wales where there are seven felled tree trunks with coins pushed into them.
The coins are usually knocked into the tree trunks using stones by passers-by, who hope it will bring them good fortune. These fascinating spectacles often have coins from centuries ago buried deep in their bark, warped from the passage of time.
The tradition of making offerings to deities at wishing trees dates back hundreds of years and is similar to the concept of a “wishing well”, where one tosses a coin in for good luck. The “wishing trees” date back to the early 1700s in Scotland where ill people stuck florins into trees with the idea that the trees would take any any illness. However if someone were to take away any of the coins, legend states that they will become ill instead.
sources 1, 2, 3

odditiesoflife:

Mysterious Coin-Covered Wishing Trees

The strange phenomenon of gnarled old trees with coins embedded all over their bark has been spotted from the Peak District to the Scottish Highlands in the United Kingdom. One of the larger collections can be seen in the picturesque village of Portmeirion in Wales where there are seven felled tree trunks with coins pushed into them.

The coins are usually knocked into the tree trunks using stones by passers-by, who hope it will bring them good fortune. These fascinating spectacles often have coins from centuries ago buried deep in their bark, warped from the passage of time.

The tradition of making offerings to deities at wishing trees dates back hundreds of years and is similar to the concept of a “wishing well”, where one tosses a coin in for good luck. The “wishing trees” date back to the early 1700s in Scotland where ill people stuck florins into trees with the idea that the trees would take any any illness. However if someone were to take away any of the coins, legend states that they will become ill instead.

sources 1, 2, 3

(Source: hohokev)

"I’m afraid he’s infected with the casual. He’s just going to have to…. to-"

image

(Source: buttcanine)

hailkyle:

here

professor-pigeon:

I googled ‘swimming pigeon’ once and I still haven’t recovered from this picture

image

(source)